1/22: Craziest Massage Of My Life

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Bad quality but breakfast was the sweet potato bun I bought at the festival yesterday!
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OOTD

I decided to try out a trendy cafe today and went to Rocket Coffeebar. It was wayyyy overpriced. I paid $5 for coffee and water -___- uuummm

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Soy milk latte

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Anyway, after the cafe I walked to House of Joy for lunch. I got Chinese noodle soup, which was good and healthy, but the restaurant itself was lacking atmosphere and the staff was not the warmest.

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I took a public bus to Pratunam market. The bus guy didn’t charge me for some reason, so I got a free ride….? It’s a mystery how that happened.
Anyway, the market was CRAZY. Absolutely ridiculous. It extends forever and ever, with hundreds of clothes stalls to sift through.

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Deep into the market: you’ll find an old mall turned into market!!
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So crazy

It was also quite bizarre: they don’t let you try on anything, and there are no mirrors to see how it would look on you when you hold it up against your body. Plus, some stores were randomly “closed” even though the shopkeepers were still there. I also got the feeling that a lot of the stores were fronts for other (perhaps illegal) things. That might just be my paranoid mind though.

After a few hours of wandering, I got a banana and apple smoothie. I wasn’t sure how the apple would taste in a smoothie, but it was actually delicious! I am an apple smoothie believer now.

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I decided I deserved a massage after all the walking, so I headed toward a massage place Ronald (friend from hostel) had told me about. It took me forever because I kept getting distracted by stores and was also debating whether or not to take the bus; I would see a bus stop, wait a few minutes to see if my bus was coming, then give up and start walking again, then approach another bus stop and wait to see… and on and on. In the end, I walked the whole way there (it was about 3 miles).

This place, Tony’s Thai Massage, only charges 100 baht (about $3) an hour, which is half the price of most massage places in Thailand. I wasn’t sure if it would be good since it’s so cheap, but…

OMG THIS MASSAGE WAS CRAZY!! My massage guy put pressure on areas I didn’t know you could put pressure on: around my knees, on the outside of my arm, the sides of my stomach, etc. It hurt a lot at some parts… I tried really hard to stay relaxed but it was difficult. I’ve also realized that whenever I get a massage, my calves hurt the most for some reason. Not sure if that’s a normal experience or if my calves are especially tight.

This was the first time I felt like I got a REAL Thai massage. I guess having a guy versus a girl really makes a difference. The first two massages I got were from girls, and they didn’t apply nearly as much pressure on my muscles as this guy did. I also couldn’t tell if it was good or bad; is it supposed to be painful?

After that *experience,* I walked to May Veggie Home for dinner. The menu was a little expensive–  all the mains were about 200 baht, which is more than I normally pay. I got the green curry because it was only 89 baht. It was fine! Nothing special. The rice was cool though.

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Green curry
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Star rice!

At this point, I was feeling guilty for spending whole day alone. I don’t know if it was because I myself wanted to hang out with other people, or if it was because I felt external societal pressure to hang out with other people.

I honestly don’t mind spending the whole day alone, but when I think about what the people back at the hostel would think, they would probably think it was weird that I walked around all day by myself and ate lunch and dinner alone. Or maybe that’s just me projecting my own insecurities. IDK.

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Monks on the subway home
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lol

Anyway, I tried to reduce the guilt by ending the day with some socialization.  I met 3 Swedish girls at the hostel. They were quite young; they were all 20 years old, had just graduated high school, and were in their second gap year. Second!! Unfathomable in the U.S. Few people take one gap year, let alone two. Pretty cool that they were traveling so long and far, and at such a young age. And they were all so good at English… I still am so impressed by how good Europeans are at English. They don’t even have to THINK about it when they speak, it flows out so naturally.

 

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